You don't need super powers to be a resilient leader

Ad Esse Consulting leadership resilience with batman, superman and the flash

If you’re like us, you’ll appreciate the DC Comics reference above. Despite not having any superpowers himself, Batman is still figthing crime in the same league as Superman and the Flash. Likewise, you don’t need to be the ‘perfect’ leader and have all the answers right away.

Particularly during times of change and crisis, your team needs support from you as a leader. In this newsletter, we’ve asked for help from our business psychologist partner, Hazel Anderson-Turner.

“Life throws challenges but with patience and resilience, you can convert every challenge into a new opportunity to grow.”

– Amit Ray

Hazel Anderson Turner, Business Psychologist at Ad Esse

Hazel Anderson-Turner,
Business Psychologist

Working with the NHS during the Covid-19 pandemic, Royal Berkshire Fire & Rescue Service, and other service providers, Hazel has over 15 years’ experience in business psychology.

Partnered with Ad Esse Consulting, Hazel can help you to understand what influences the behaviour of your employees and support leadership resilience.

Working with Hazel

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Ad Esse Shelfie Becky Mitchard

By signing up to our virtual book launch, you will be the first to know the release date, receive a free copy of the book and there’s much more to come.

Supporting your team through transitions

Whether you’re leading a change programme, or coping with the effects of Covid-19, here are Hazel’s top three tips for supporting your people through transition:

1. Normalise the discomfort
2. Encourage forward planning
3. Make ‘asking for help’ an expectation

Watch the video below for more detail.

Google’s Head of Global Resilience: Tips on avoiding burnout

Lauren Whitt, head of global resilience at Google, explains that the risk of burnout is lower in people with higher resilience. She shares six tips that people at Google use to develop resilience, including the T.E.A. exercise.

See six ways to develop your resilience

Resilient leaders like you

Anita Roddick, Founder of The Body Shop

The Body Shop’s mission statement is “to dedicate our business to the pursuit of social and environmental change.” Roddick built a successful business whilst retaining an ethical stance, overcoming difficult challenges such as surviving on a shoestring budget, a local funeral parlour objecting to her business name, and criticism over valuing environmental projects ahead of products and customer satisfaction.

Read more about Anita Roddick
 

Arianna Huffington

Founder of the Huffington Post, Arianna Huffington is a resilient business woman. After collapsing from exhaustion in 2007, she changed her attitude towards wellbeing and redefining success. She left HuffPost in 2016 to launch Thrive Global, a media company that tackles burnout and workplace stress. Huffington speaks more about ‘thriving’ on Guy Kawasaki’s Remarkable People podcast.

Listen to the podcast


Martin Luther King Jr., activist of the American civil rights movement

Alongside the iconic ‘I have a dream’ speech, Martin Luther King Jr. led a series on non-violent campaigns to achieve civil rights and won the Nobel Prize in 1964. To achieve this success, he remained resilient in the face of adversity such as long days of tiring work, numerous arrests, and violent attacks.

Read more about Martin Luther King Jr.

No Hard Feelings

Leaders need to be resilient for themselves and their team to bring out the best in people and provide better services for your end users. In the book, No Hard Feelings, Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy promote the importance of tackling emotions at work. They provide practical advice for becoming a more creative, collaborative & productive team through harnessing emotions.

Here are four practical tips from the book about leadership:

“1. Show vulnerability when assessing a difficult situation, but present a clear path forward.

2. Become a student of the people you manage: avoid telling people what to feel, listen carefully, and manage individually.

3. Prioritize yourself and seek support from other leaders to avoid emotional leaks that negatively affect your reports.

4. Understand the challenges you and others may face in leadership positions and take steps to reduce them.”

(Fosslien & Duffy, pg 229)

No hard feelings by Liz Fosslien and Molly Anne Duffy book, recommended by Ad Esse Consulting

No hard feelings: Emotions at work
(and how they help us succeed)

“A must-read that topples the idea that emotions don’t belong in the workplace.”

(Susan Cain, Ted Talk speaker & Author of Quiet)

Let me know what you think. Have you applied the book concepts / ideas yourself? Join me as a guest on the Not Another Book Review podcast; reply to this email to take part or find out more.

"The work with managers has been very successful... Ad Esse have helped them start their journey to becoming effective leaders."

– Kam Basra, Head of Transformation at Citizen Housing

We all need to ask for help sometimes. That’s why we’ve partnered with Hazel Anderson-Turner, a business psychologist who can help support your people through transition, provide coaching and strengthen the resilience of your team.  

To discuss how a business psychologist could support you in making a successful transition, email hello@ad-esse.com or use the contact page.